Oakley Cityhood Celebration

View the City Of Oakley Chamber Member page
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Past Event Tags: Celebration, Cityhood, and Fireworks.

Oakley has been around since the 19th century, but only incorporated as a city in 1999, making it California’s youngest city. Cityhood is something worth celebrating: among other things, it keeps Brentwood from encroaching on our territory.

The evening concluded with a rather nice fireworks display, which helped compensate for the fact that Wednesday’s fireworks in Antioch were delayed by a fire started over on Kimball Island. (Probably by illegal fireworks. I am not even sure where Californians buy illegal fireworks, but Delta residents certainly seem to have a lot of them, and I’m not talking about bottle rockets, either.)

So we saw lots of emergency vehicles rushing down to the shoreline, and lots of other unofficial fireworks, but got tired of waiting and came home. (The moonrise as we were driving back was the most impressive sight of the evening.)

Oakley’s Chamber of Commerce sponsored two booths at the Cityhood celebration, one selling glow bracelets and one selling hot dogs and hamburgers. Proceeds from both go to the chamber’s scholarship for Freedom High School, whose soccer field was the locus of the event. (We are very patriotic out here in the Delta. Everything seems to be Freedom this or Liberty that.)

I am a bit vague on the details of this scholarship; if they were provided with my member packet, I must have skipped that part. I know the students have to compete pretty hard for it. In any case, it supposedly justifies charging $5 for a hot dog, a packet of crisps, and a soda, which any booth at a fair would probably do anyway, because they have a captive audience and those places are always rip-offs. Giving away the money is typical of this chamber of commerce, which is open-handed and broke.

The fireworks are certainly just as good as the ones at the Marin County Fair or anywhere else I’ve seen them lately, and you get a good view sitting in the soccer field. (We even had chairs from the booth, without having to haul them from the car.) The event itself is free; a wristband for rides for young children, if you have them, is all of $5. (The Euro-Bungy, which is a sort of swing set made of bungy cords, and the pony rides appeared to be most popular.)

I don’t have any photos of the fireworks because I don’t know enough about my camera to try to make it do that, and anyway, fireworks are not as much fun from behind a camera lens. And there aren’t any photos of me serving hot dogs because we were all too busy working to take any pictures by then.

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